My name is Laura. I'm a 23 year old theatre major. I'm an open lesbian, but it doesn't effect my life much. I like geeky things, and my fangirl obsessions, while intense, can shift at moment's notice.

I write a lot. I also draw sometimes. I think dragons are awesome. I post random stuff about my life and my interests here. My current obsessions are 'Rise of the Guardians' and 'RWBY', subject to change whenever the hell I feel like it.

I also have a more formal blog that I never update.

 

drowningostrich:

Huntacular Googie Game Giveaway - Guardians’ Egg? - 4/19/14

Today’s tag hint: youneedasearchwarren

"Do you think he liked the game?? My fairies said he seemed pretty happy…"

"Of course! Everyone loves the egg huntings, same as everyone loves the sleigh. No eggs-aggeratings."

The largest Guardian laughed at his own joke and nudged both Jack and Sandy to join in the humor. Sandy showed a dreamsand egg breaking in two as it ascended, and North’s laughter turned into a roar.

"Cracking up! Is very funny, Sandy."

Jack had been chuckling, too, but his attention was mostly focused on scanning the Warren. Streams of googies emerged from tunnels that led up from the lower cold storage, but their creator was nowhere in sight. Jack tried not to think about it too much, but he did really want to know if Bunny had enjoyed their game. Maybe he had, or maybe it had seemed annoying… either way, the Guardian of Fun had promised the Burgess kids he’d let them know how Bunny reacted. They all seemed confident that he’d love it.

"Right, thanks for coming, mates." Bunny leapt from a tunnel in a rush and landed on a boulder in front of the other Guardians. Jack tried not to look too expectant as he studied the Pooka, attempting to pick up on any signs of either merriment or disapproval. But Bunny just seemed focused and business-like.

Right, okay, that was… okay. Very normal.

"We’re already underway, so I’ll keep this brief. As usual, we’re moving with the time zones. Same latitude assignments and protocol as last year, same buddy-system arrangement for major urban areas. Only one change. New safety measure. If anything does go wrong or ya notice something suspicious as ya make your rounds, use one of these."

Bunny hopped from his perch and set down the four googies he’d been holding in his arms. They were beautifully colored and intricately detailed with abstract shapes that matched the particular Guardian each one ran up to.

"If they take off while you’re out there, follow their lead, they know where to go. Should keep us better organized. They can open a tunnel to the next location if ya get off course or to bring us all to each other if need be, which is crash hot for any emergency."

Jack nodded as he bent down to pick up the shining egg standing by his ankle. If only they’d had these that first Easter…

"In short, if one a’ these beauties opens a tunnel, follow it. You’re needed at the other end. And don’t lose it, under any circumstances, or we’ve basically got ourselves a security breach. Any questions?"

None were raised, and Bunny’s intensity and urgency seemed to spread to the other Guardians as they took off for the first hour of the egg hunt.

-ROTG-

Twenty-four hours later, Jack smiled with relief as he watched the last group of kids in Alaska complete their egg hunt. He plopped down beside his special googie.

"Success, little eggling!" He held out a finger to his small companion. Jack laughed away the last of his tension as it unhesitatingly lifted a little foot to tap the fingertip in a strange kind of high-five gesture.

He stretched out on the cool grass. “I guess we should get back now, huh? Maybe Bunny will be relaxed enough to remember about the game… I gotta tell the kids something other than ‘he was unimpressed and forgot all about it’.” He picked at the grass.

Jack sighed and looked over at the silvery blue egg just in time to see it stamp it’s little foot against the ground. The winter spirit gave a yelp and rolled away as five flowers burst from the earth. Each was a different color, but they were all glowing with that magical light the Warren flora possessed.

Jack stared from the egg to the flowers and back.

"What?"

The googie nodded to the blooms.

With a perplexed look, Jack reached out and gently touched one. The ground beneath him opened and he was falling into a mossy tunnel before he had time to think. Spinning around and halting his descent, he barely had time to see that the egg now seemed to have a painted face- a rather wicked and smirky face- before it leapt down after him, sealing the tunnel behind it. It raced past Jack.

"Wait! Augh! Of course Bunny would give me a malfunctioning one…"

Jack took off after the egg. He’d been through a ‘security breach’ once, and he was not about to let that happen again…

The Game:

You’ve just found a post that is part of the Huntacular Googie Game Giveaway! If you’d like to play along, please read the rules.

If you’ve done that and still want to play, reblog this post by 3pm PST on 4/20/14 with your guess (1, 2, 3, 4 or 5). Which of those flowers would you have reached for first, if you were Jack? Only guess once! It’s that simple. Then check back on 4/20/14 at 4pm PST on http://drowningostrich.tumblr.com to see if you won! (Winners are entered into the grand prize drawing announced on Easter Sunday, 4/20/14)

Intro

How to Play

Round One (closed)

Round One Winners

Round Two (closed)

Round Two Winners

Round Three (closed)

Round Three Winners

Round Four (closed)

Round Four Winners

Round Five (closed)

Round Five Winners

2!

oreides:

starbaeddelsg1:

gcvsa:


aka14kgold:

arbitrary-mask:

thepeoplesrecord:
The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’April 16, 2014
Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.
This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.
To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.
Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.
Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.
The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.
However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.
People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.
One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.
It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.
Source

“Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere…”
HOW? WITH WHAT FUNDS? FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? TO WHERE?
Our society’s approach to its most vulnerable members: I don’t want to see them suffer—so get them out of my sight!




There have been a few periods in my life when I have needed to sleep in my vehicle for several days at a time, and some of those periods have been when it would have been best for me to avoid the scrutiny of the police, shall we say, because the consequences would have been disproportionate.I’ve gotten pretty good at finding places to sleep in my car where I am less likely to attract attention.First of all, forget shopping center parking lots, train stations, or any place like that where they will either have regular patrols or your vehicle will be isolated. Nothing attracts a cops attention like a vehicle seemingly out of place. Assume they *will* investigate. Although Wal-Mart allows RVers to park overnight, they also generally have security or police around, and if you don’t look like an RVer, except to be hassled.Assume that anyone who encounters you in the early morning will notify the police. The time just after dawn is the most dangerous, because there will be light enough to see into your vehicle, but you are likely to be too exhausted to note this fact and totally unconscious until the cops start banging on your window.Try to find a place where you can park your vehicle among others like it. I have found, as a pickup driver, that industrial parks can be useful, because there are often other company light trucks parked overnight and people don’t usually show up to work until 8am-ish. On weekends, this works even better, because the office might be closed from Friday evening till Monday morning, or at least from Saturday evening til Monday morning.I once found a great place outside of Nashville, TN that was an abandoned home site up a hill, with a paved driveway that led up into the trees where you couldn’t be seen from the road. I slept pretty well that night, at least as far as a 6’ 1” tall person can sleep in a vehicle with the interior completely filled except for the driver’s seat with their possessions.Avoid using the same site two nights in a row, if you can help it, especially if people come by and see you in the morning. If you must remain in the same area, use your days to scout for other potential sites to sleep safely.


this is really, really important and i hope everyone reads it.

oreides:

starbaeddelsg1:

gcvsa:

aka14kgold:

arbitrary-mask:

thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’
April 16, 2014

Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.

This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.

To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.

Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.

The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.

However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.

People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.

One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.

It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.

Source

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere…”

HOW? WITH WHAT FUNDS? FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? TO WHERE?

Our society’s approach to its most vulnerable members: I don’t want to see them suffer—so get them out of my sight!

There have been a few periods in my life when I have needed to sleep in my vehicle for several days at a time, and some of those periods have been when it would have been best for me to avoid the scrutiny of the police, shall we say, because the consequences would have been disproportionate.

I’ve gotten pretty good at finding places to sleep in my car where I am less likely to attract attention.

First of all, forget shopping center parking lots, train stations, or any place like that where they will either have regular patrols or your vehicle will be isolated. Nothing attracts a cops attention like a vehicle seemingly out of place. Assume they *will* investigate. Although Wal-Mart allows RVers to park overnight, they also generally have security or police around, and if you don’t look like an RVer, except to be hassled.

Assume that anyone who encounters you in the early morning will notify the police. The time just after dawn is the most dangerous, because there will be light enough to see into your vehicle, but you are likely to be too exhausted to note this fact and totally unconscious until the cops start banging on your window.

Try to find a place where you can park your vehicle among others like it. I have found, as a pickup driver, that industrial parks can be useful, because there are often other company light trucks parked overnight and people don’t usually show up to work until 8am-ish. On weekends, this works even better, because the office might be closed from Friday evening till Monday morning, or at least from Saturday evening til Monday morning.

I once found a great place outside of Nashville, TN that was an abandoned home site up a hill, with a paved driveway that led up into the trees where you couldn’t be seen from the road. I slept pretty well that night, at least as far as a 6’ 1” tall person can sleep in a vehicle with the interior completely filled except for the driver’s seat with their possessions.

Avoid using the same site two nights in a row, if you can help it, especially if people come by and see you in the morning. If you must remain in the same area, use your days to scout for other potential sites to sleep safely.

this is really, really important and i hope everyone reads it.

art-of-swords:

Short Sword

  • Dated: circa 1530 — 1540
  • Culture: South German or Swiss
  • Medium: steel, leather
  • Measurements: overall length,78.6 cm; grup length, 8.2 cm; blade length, 65.3 cm, quillons width, 18.6 cm; weight, 1.5 kg

The form of the guards of this sword is typically South German of the second quarter of the 16th century, but the pommel is as distinctively Venetian while its blade bears the mark of Basle. It seems that such marks stamped upon blades do not refer to its place of origin of the blade, but of the hilt in which it is mounted. Therefore it seems to be reasonable to assume that this sword is, basically, Swiss, though it has the appearance of a hybrid.

A particularly fine sword with a similar guard is in Rome, in the Odescalchi Collection, Mu. no. 185. This is illustrated in Nolfo di Carpegna’s catalogue of its collection, and in Boccia and Coelho’s ‘Nemi Bianche Italiane’, no. 381. A sword with an almost identical pommel and similar guards was sold by the Galerie Helbing in Madrid in 1908, from which sale some of the Medieval swords in the Fitzwilliam Collection came.

The pommel has the form of a crown of three fleusons, the middle on a long truncated cone accommodating the top of the long, which is switched over without a button. The sword features a half-basket guard of four elements of flat triangular section. The knuckle-guard is turned over at the top, the loop-guard covering the back of the hand, springing from the top of the knuckle-guard and meeting the midpoint of a forward ring-guard. Between these two guards is an S-shaped counter-guard. 

The sword has a straight quillons of the same flat triangular section as the guards. The quillons widens toward the tips, which are cut off straight and finished with small spherical knobs. The back-guard is made of one bar, springing from the root of the outside quillon and joining the end of a single short outside branch.

The grip is of oval section, widening toward the pommel, covered in red-brown leather. The broad back-edged blade, with a shallow fuller just inside the back edge which ends in a short cusp at the point. The back is very slightly curved. The blade bears its stamped mark of the City of Basle.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

elphabaoftheopera:

eldrkevinprice:

if the broadway and theatre community dislikes bootlegs so much and don’t want people filming their shows they need to work on making theatre a more accessible form of media by filming shows professionally because you know they talk a lot about being a very open welcoming community but don’t do anything to make that community welcoming to people who can’t afford to see shows or people who live in rural areas and are literally unable to attend shows at all

image

rankinqs:

Reblog this! People need to know and protect their Tumblr, my friend clicked this and it doesn’t let her on Tumblr anymore! 

rankinqs:

Reblog this! People need to know and protect their Tumblr, my friend clicked this and it doesn’t let her on Tumblr anymore! 

mollywaddle:

my sexuality is girls all the time and boys if they’re famous, almost offensively beautiful and completely unattainable so i can attach all my impossible ideals to them and never have to have anything to do with them irl